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Archive for the ‘Process Serving’ Category

Technology and how we use it

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

I was planning a route to a court hearing the other day and suddenly realised how easy my life was with the internet on call 24/7 to allow me to compare different forms of travel, check times and costs, as well as booking train tickets and seats if necessary.

It made me think how different it was not so long ago.  When I was younger and before I started my firm, Herdens, which subsequently merged with my parents business, Geoden Agency, I can remember my Father planning routes to interviews and locus sites all around the country, just using a map and his general knowledge.

I used to accompany him on some of these trips and can remember what an exciting day it was when he got an analogue mobile phone, so that we were able to keep everyone updated with our current location and expected arrival time.  Now I naturally carry a mobile phone with me all the time, but I also often carry a laptop equipped with mobile broadband so that I can access the internet and keep up with my e-mails wherever I might be.

With my laptop, I am able to call on people to take statements and type it up in front of them and allow them to proof read it there and then.  This is compared with the old system of handwritten statements where the handwriting had to be deciphered by the interviewee, before the statement was typed up in the office and carried back and forth by post.  Where telephone statements are taken the draft can be e-mailed to the relevant person, allowing them to make on screen corrections instead of untidy handwritten corrections, before returning the pristine signed copy.

Locus reports are a whole different ball game now as well.  Previously they were all taken with either a point and shoot or SLR camera using film.  Settings had to be adjusted to take into account light levels and you were never sure of the outcome until the film was processed which could take some time and would increase our charges.  Now all locus reports are carried out using a digital camera where the images can be previewed before leaving the site to ensure that all angles and relevant points have been covered.

Other things have also moved on significantly.  Although we still receive many of our instructions by post, we also receive many by e-mail.  Any paper files are scanned on to our central server along with all outgoing letters etc.  Staff members can then access the server from anywhere in the world as long as they have an internet connection, allowing them to promptly deal with queries and check up on relevant information.

Our desire to move with the times in terms of technology will not be stopping any time soon, as we truly believe that it brings efficiencies to us and benefits to our clients, not the least us being able to keep our fees to a reasonable level.

We are currently trialling a small body worn camera which amongst other things will allow us to record process serves for our own protection and to avoid any attempts to deny receipt of the papers.  In the near future I am looking at upgrading my current mobile phone to a new generation smart phone which will allow me to access many features of my laptop from my pocket.  We are also investigating the possibility of using iPad’s or similar as a lightweight way of carrying electronic files which would save the need to print files out where they were originally received electronically.

The other thing worth adding is that where we do not have the technology to hand, we probably know someone who does.  Through other professional private investigators and technology professionals, we have access to items such as covert trackers, covert cameras, some with remote viewing and other “James Bond” type devices.

was planning a route to a court hearing the other day and suddenly realised how easy my life was with the internet on call 24/7 to allow me to compare different forms of travel, check times and costs, as well as booking train tickets and seats if necessary.

 

It made me think how different it was not so long ago. When I was younger and before I started my firm, Herdens, which subsequently merged with my parents business, Geoden Agency, I can remember my father planning routes to interviews and locus sites all around the country, just using a map and his general knowledge.

 

I used to accompany him on some of these trips and can remember what an exciting day it was when he got an analogue mobile phone, so that we were able to keep everyone updated with our current location and expected arrival time. Now I naturally carry a mobile phone with me all the time, but I also often carry a laptop equipped with mobile broadband so that I can access the internet and keep up with my e-mails wherever I might be.

 

With my laptop, I am able to call on people to take statements and type it up in front of them and allow them to proof read it there and then. This is compared with the old system of handwritten statements where the handwriting had to be deciphered by the interviewee, before the statement was typed up in the office and carried back and forth by post. Where telephone statements are taken the draft can be e-mailed to the relevant person, allowing them to make on screen corrections instead of untidy handwritten corrections, before returning the pristine signed copy.

 

Locus reports are a whole different ball game now as well. Previously they were all taken with either a point and shoot or SLR camera using film. Settings had to be adjusted to take into account light levels and you were never sure of the outcome until the film was processed which could take some time and would increase our charges. Now all locus reports are carried out using a digital camera where the images can be previewed before leaving the site to ensure that all angles and relevant points have been covered.

 

Other things have also moved on significantly. Although we still receive many of our instructions by post, we also receive many by e-mail. Any paper files are scanned on to our central server along with all outgoing letters etc. Staff members can then access the server from anywhere in the world as long as they have an internet connection, allowing them to promptly deal with queries and check up on relevant information.

 

Our desire to move with the times in terms of technology will not be stopping any time soon, as we truly believe that it brings efficiencies to us and benefits to our clients, not the least us being able to keep our fees to a reasonable level.

 

We are currently trialling a small body worn camera which amongst other things will allow us to record process serves for our own protection and to avoid any attempts to deny receipt of the papers. In the near future I am lookin

I was planning a route to a court hearing the other day and suddenly realised how easy my life was with the internet on call 24/7 to allow me to compare different forms of travel, check times and costs, as well as booking train tickets and seats if necessary.

It made me think how different it was not so long ago.  When I was younger and before I started my firm, Herdens, which subsequently merged with my parents business, Geoden Agency, I can remember my father planning routes to interviews and locus sites all around the country, just using a map and his general knowledge.

I used to accompany him on some of these trips and can remember what an exciting day it was when he got an analogue mobile phone, so that we were able to keep everyone updated with our current location and expected arrival time.  Now I naturally carry a mobile phone with me all the time, but I also often carry a laptop equipped with mobile broadband so that I can access the internet and keep up with my e-mails wherever I might be.

With my laptop, I am able to call on people to take statements and type it up in front of them and allow them to proof read it there and then.  This is compared with the old system of handwritten statements where the handwriting had to be deciphered by the interviewee, before the statement was typed up in the office and carried back and forth by post.  Where telephone statements are taken the draft can be e-mailed to the relevant person, allowing them to make on screen corrections instead of untidy handwritten corrections, before returning the pristine signed copy.

Locus reports are a whole different ball game now as well.  Previously they were all taken with either a point and shoot or SLR camera using film.  Settings had to be adjusted to take into account light levels and you were never sure of the outcome until the film was processed which could take some time and would increase our charges.  Now all locus reports are carried out using a digital camera where the images can be previewed before leaving the site to ensure that all angles and relevant points have been covered.

Other things have also moved on significantly.  Although we still receive many of our instructions by post, we also receive many by e-mail.  Any paper files are scanned on to our central server along with all outgoing letters etc.  Staff members can then access the server from anywhere in the world as long as they have an internet connection, allowing them to promptly deal with queries and check up on relevant information.

Our desire to move with the times in terms of technology will not be stopping any time soon, as we truly believe that it brings efficiencies to us and benefits to our clients, not the least us being able to keep our fees to a reasonable level.

We are currently trialling a small body worn camera which amongst other things will allow us to record process serves for our own protection and to avoid any attempts to deny receipt of the papers.  In the near future I am looking at upgrading my current mobile phone to a new generation smart phone which will allow me to access many features of my laptop from my pocket.  We are also investigating the possibility of using iPad’s or similar as a lightweight way of carrying electronic files which would save the need to print files out where they were originally received electronically.

The other thing worth adding is that where we do not have the technology to hand, we probably know someone who does.  Through other professional private investigators and technology professionals, we have access to items such as covert trackers, covert cameras, some with remote viewing and other “James Bond” type devices.

g at upgrading my current mobile phone to a new generation smart phone which will allow me to access many features of my laptop from my pocket. We are also investigating the possibility of using iPad’s or similar as a lightweight way of carrying electronic files which would save the need to print files out where they were originally received electronically.

 

The other thing worth adding is that where we do not have the technology to hand, we probably know someone who does. Through other professional private investigators and technology professionals, we have access to items such as covert trackers, covert cameras, some with remote viewing and other “James Bond” type devices.

Process Server – Just a glorified postman?

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

It is not unusual that a process server will describe themselves as just a glorified postman, frequently to those receiving the documents, however if this is the case then why do solicitors continue to use professional process servers instead of Royal Mail?

The Royal Mail is pretty good at what it does, but everyone is aware of the well documented flaws.  For a legal document to be served correctly it is important to be sure that it has been delivered and received by the intended recipient.  Using the Royal Mail firstly the letter would have to be sent by recorded delivery so that it could be tracked to its destination, to prove delivery.

The next problem comes when delivery is attempted.  How many of us have received letters or parcels that have been signed for by other members of our household or even left with a neighbour for safe keeping.  In this case the Royal Mail has performed their duty by ensuring that the letter has been delivered to the address, but how can anyone be sure if the intended recipient will receive the document and if they do, how long it will take before they open it and take account of the contents.  The same problems occur when using a courier company.

By instructing a process server you can be sure that if a document can be served personally, it will be.  Professional process servers are very determined people who will never intentionally allow a target to evade service.  Should the recipient of the papers not be in on the first visit, discreet enquiries will usually be made with neighbours to confirm residency and the best time to call back again to find the person in and maximise the chance of personal service.  It is usually found that the best time to visit is out of conventional office hours and a process server will be more than happy to attend at the most appropriate time.

Once personal service is effected, the process server will complete a statement of service or swear an affidavit containing all the relevant details to confirm service of the papers.  This can then be entered into court and in very rare cases the process server can be called upon to give oral evidence under oath in open court regarding the service of the papers.  I don’t believe that this is a service that you will find the Royal Mail or any similar company offering any time soon!

Herdens can provide process servers throughout the UK to ensure the prompt and efficient service of all types of legal documents.  Services are usually provided on a fixed fee basis to include multiple visits if necessary and a statement of service or affidavit of service included in the cost.